How to use F503

December 24, 2008

Q:
can you please give me more details on how to use @F503@ to auto print to a network printer i.e. \\Server1\nursing which is a Lexmark T642.

A:
When using the data field @F503 you can optionally also specify the name of the printer. Example:
@F503 \\server1\nursing@


Cornelia Wegmueller, Customer & Partner Support
ActiveFax Communication Group
a division of INTERTRADE ENTERPRISES

Switzerland / Europe:
INTERTRADE ENTERPRISES LTD
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Phone: +41 44 5866974 :: Fax: +41 44 2742350
mailto:support@activefax-distribution.com

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INTERTRADE ENTERPRISES LLC
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Phone: +1 (561) 459-3606

INTERTRADE GROUP WebSites:
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http://www.CreaCity-group.com
http://www.InstantWeb48.com
http://www.Intertrade.cc

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Tourism Impacts, Planning and Management

December 24, 2008

“…an extremely welcome text… balancing confidence in its topic with accessibility and clarity.”
Bryn Parry, Senior Lecturer, Southampton Business School, UK

“Mason’s book is a digest of the theory and practice of management and planning of tourism impact. Succinctly and clearly written it provides an excellent introduction to the subject.
The book contains many well thought out case studies from many different countries and on a wide variety of topics. Many of them are based directly on the work of the author and his research associates. This first hand approach adds credibility to much of what is discussed in the book.”
Keith Dewar, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, Canada –Keith Dewar, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, Canada

Tourism Impacts, Planning and Management, Second Edition


Strategic Management of Information Systems in Healthcare

December 24, 2008

Strategic Management of Information Systems in Healthcare explores how healthcare organizations can use information technology to achieve better operational performance and strengthen their market position. The book explains how to move beyond applying technology to current practices, and use the enabling power of IT to redesign work processes to achieve high levels of performance. Topics covered include: The structure of IT and how it can be used to manage clinical and business functions How IT is used to position an organization in a competitive market The management of information resources, including investing in IT, structure and staffing, and information security and ethics How IT may impact the health system of the future, including an assessment of current policy initiatives

About the Author
Gordon D. Brown, PhD, is a professor in and chair of the department of health management and informatics at the University of Missouri-Colulmbia. Tamara T. Stone, PhD, is assistant professor in the department of health management and informatics and fellow at the Center for Healthcare Quality at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Timothy B. Patrick, PhD, is asstistant professor in the department of health management and informatics and associate director of the National Library of Medicine Biomedical and Health Informatics Research Training Program at the University of Missouri-Columbia

Strategic Management of Information Systems in Healthcare


Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations

December 24, 2008

“I have been using this book as a required text since the very first edition. It provides a framework which integrates some of the most important concepts in modern management with cases from the jhealth services field. I highly recommend this book and compliment the authors for their important contributions to our field.” Dr Barry Greene, University of Iowa

“. . .the definitive text on strategic management in healthcare” Dr Janet E. Perter, University of NC at Chapel Hill

From the 4th edition: “I have been using this book as a required text since the very first edition. It provides a framework which integrates some of the most important concepts in modern management with cases from the jhealth services field. I highly recommend this book and compliment the authors for their important contributions to our field.” Dr Barry Greene, University of Iowa “…the definitive text on strategic management in healthcare” Dr Janet E. Perter, University of NC at Chapel Hill

Product Description
The revised and updated fifth edition of this classic text introduces strategic thinking and planning strategies to advanced undergraduate and graduate students as well as practitioners in the field of health care.
# Demonstrates how strategic managers may become strategic thinkers
# Shows how to develop and document a plan of action through strategic planning
# Teaches managers to evaluate strategic plans, learn more about what works, and incorporate new strategic thinking into future planning, strategy formulation, or situation analysis.
# Provides strategic momentum “maps” and other tools for evaluating the changing environment, analyzing data, and developing new strategic directions
# Consists of ten revised chapters that contain new or updated Introductory Incidents and Perspectives
# Appendix A has been revised to match new strategic thinking and implement the strategic momentum model
# Contains 8 new cases plus 4 completely updated classics.

A designated textsite featuring an Instructor’s Manual, downloadable exhibits from the text, and sample chapters is also available at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/swayne.

Strategic Management of Health Care Organizations (5th Edition)


Managing Health Care Information Systems: A Practical Approach for Health Care Executives

December 24, 2008

“This should be required reading for all health care administrators… This book is grounded in this research, which is a strong point. . . . It gives some practical advice on how to manage the project to success… This experience is invaluable.” — Anne M. Bobb, BS Pharm (Northwestern Memorial Hospital), in Doody Publishing.

“This should be required reading for all health care administrators… This book is grounded in this research, which is a strong point… It gives some practical advice on how to manage the project to success… This experience is invaluable.” — Anne M. Bobb, BS Pharm (Northwestern Memorial Hospital), in Doody Publishing.

Review
“This is the first book that comprehensively describes both opportunities and issues in the effective management of information technology in health care.”
—James. I. Cash, Ph.D., retired James E. Robinson Professor, Harvard Business School, and chairman of IT Committee, Partners Healthcare Board of Trustees

“The challenges of managing information systems and technology in an electronic health care environment are many. But finally here is a book that succinctly takes the reader from the basics to the boardroom in meeting such challenges. This book is a great resource.”
—Melanie S. Brodnik, Ph.D., director, Health Informatics and Information Management, The Ohio State University

“As IT breaks out of the business office and permeates the clinical world, every health care executive will need first-hand, in-depth knowledge of the topic. This book is just what that the doctor ordered.”
—Mark Leavitt, M.D., Ph.D., medical director and director of ambulatory care, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

“Managing Healthcare Information Systems transcends the complexity of health care and presents in one place, a clear, concise view of health care computing. The detail and clarity of the book speak to the author’s in-depth knowledge of health care computing and their ability to make it understandable for all in the field. This book must be the foundation for all students embarking on careers in health care and is an outstanding refresher for those of us already in the field.”
—Bert Reese, vice president and chief information officer, Sentara Healthcare

Managing Health Care Information Systems: A Practical Approach for Health Care Executives


Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t

December 24, 2008

Five years ago, Jim Collins asked the question, “Can a good company become a great company and if so, how?” In Good to Great Collins, the author of Built to Last, concludes that it is possible, but finds there are no silver bullets. Collins and his team of researchers began their quest by sorting through a list of 1,435 companies, looking for those that made substantial improvements in their performance over time. They finally settled on 11–including Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens, and Wells Fargo–and discovered common traits that challenged many of the conventional notions of corporate success. Making the transition from good to great doesn’t require a high-profile CEO, the latest technology, innovative change management, or even a fine-tuned business strategy. At the heart of those rare and truly great companies was a corporate culture that rigorously found and promoted disciplined people to think and act in a disciplined manner. Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not so great, the book offers a well-reasoned road map to excellence that any organization would do well to consider. Like Built to Last, Good to Great is one of those books that managers and CEOs will be reading and rereading for years to come. –Harry C. Edwards

From Publishers Weekly
In what Collins terms a prequel to the bestseller Built to Last he wrote with Jerry Porras, this worthwhile effort explores the way good organizations can be turned into ones that produce great, sustained results. To find the keys to greatness, Collins’s 21-person research team (at his management research firm) read and coded 6,000 articles, generated more than 2,000 pages of interview transcripts and created 384 megabytes of computer data in a five-year project. That Collins is able to distill the findings into a cogent, well-argued and instructive guide is a testament to his writing skills. After establishing a definition of a good-to-great transition that involves a 10-year fallow period followed by 15 years of increased profits, Collins’s crew combed through every company that has made the Fortune 500 (approximately 1,400) and found 11 that met their criteria, including Walgreens, Kimberly Clark and Circuit City. At the heart of the findings about these companies’ stellar successes is what Collins calls the Hedgehog Concept, a product or service that leads a company to outshine all worldwide competitors, that drives a company’s economic engine and that a company is passionate about. While the companies that achieved greatness were all in different industries, each engaged in versions of Collins’s strategies. While some of the overall findings are counterintuitive (e.g., the most effective leaders are humble and strong-willed rather than outgoing), many of Collins’s perspectives on running a business are amazingly simple and commonsense. This is not to suggest, however, that executives at all levels wouldn’t benefit from reading this book; after all, only 11 companies managed to figure out how to change their B grade to an A on their own.

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap… and Others Don’t


Making Information Technology Work: Maximizing the Benefits for Health Care Organizations

December 24, 2008

…an excellent resource covering all the bases … a must read for CEOs, CFOs, and COOs in health care. –George A. Vecchione, President and CEO, Lifespan, Providence, RI

…gives health care managers the logic and structure they need to achieve successful IT implementations…provides tools valuable to those who need to bring projects in on time, on budget, and on target. –Alexander Szafran, Director, Radiology Services, Maine Medical Center, Portland

An incredibly useful how-to book that fits the needs of multiple levels of the organization. Readable and useful for both the generalist and the IT expert in analyzing whether to invest in a program as well as measuring outputs. –Bruce Schroffel, President and CEO, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO

Product Description
A book for senior executives, managers and clinicians that covers the before, during and after stages of a health care information technology (IT) project and provides guidance on how projects can be successfully managed. It shows readers how to assess IT project value before approval, monitor whether projects are on-time and on-budget, and measure performance after implementation. Case studies and effective project management tools and techniques help readers maximize project benefits.

Kropf and Scalzi take a three-part approach that makes it easy for non-IT executives and managers to assess a project s development from start to finish.

Click here: Making Information Technology Work: Maximizing the Benefits for Health Care Organizations